Vegetable Frittata

CSA season is about to start and if you are like me you are wondering how your will use all of your beautiful vegetables.  I love “clean out the fridge” recipes like vegetable soups and stir-fry’s.  Here is one of my favorite “clean out the fridge” recipes it this frittata can be the perfect breakfast, lunch or dinner.  Pair it with a salad and more than half of your plate will be gorgeous and nutritious vegetables!

Frittata Recipe

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

8-10 whole eggs

¾ cup low fat milk or milk alternative like almond milk

3-4 cups vegetables, chopped

Ideas: leafy greens like spinach, kale, arugula or leeks, peppers, onions, asparagus, tomatoes, broccoli, and mushrooms

Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste

2 tablespoon olive oil

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 450°F.

Cook the chopped vegetables in olive oil, until softened. Turn heat to low once vegetables cooked.

In a glass mixing bowl, thoroughly beat the eggs until nice and frothy. Add the milk and stir until combined. Season to taste with kosher salt and black pepper.

Pour the egg mixture into the skillet.

Turn the heat under the skillet to about medium and cook for about 5 minutes or until the egg begins to set around the edges; this will look slightly cooked. No stirring!

Transfer the skillet to the oven. Bake 10 to 15 minutes or until the eggs are fully cooked; you know its fully cooked with you shake the dish and the center is hard (no liquid moves).

Once cooked, turn pan upside down onto a cutting board to release the frittata. Cut into wedges like a pie.

This can be eaten cold, hot or at room temperature. Serve alongside salad for a great lunch or fruit for a quick breakfast. Also consider adding beans and whole grains like cooked quinoa to the frittata for a heartier feast!

NOTE: If you don’t have an oven-safe skillet, you can pour the egg mixture into a baking dish and add the cooked vegetables. If you do it this way, add 5 to 10 minutes to the baking time and check to make sure the egg is fully cooked before serving.

By: Katie Cavuto Boyle, MS, RD

Unite for HER and author are not responsible for any specific health or allergy needs that may require medical supervision and are not liable for any damages or negative consequences from any treatment, action, application or preparation, to any person reading or following the information in this article. References are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute endorsement of any websites or other sources. Readers should be aware that the products listed in this article may change.

Unite for HER and author are not responsible for any specific health or allergy needs that may require medical supervision and are not liable for any damages or negative consequences from any treatment, action, application or preparation, to any person reading or following the information in this article. References are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute endorsement of any websites or other sources. Readers should be aware that the products listed in this article may change.